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Colloquium

In this lecture series, leading researchers and promising young scientists report on their latest findings in the field of simulation technologies. We place particular emphasis on the interdisciplinary variety of contributions. We invite all interested parties to our Cluster Colloquium.

All colloquium dates for the Winter Term 2018/19

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Smart Sensors as Multiphysics Problems - Why Modeling and Simulations are Crucial for Successful In-Situ Measurements

Referent: Prof. Dr. Jens Anders, University of Stuttgart

Time
4:00 pm
Auditorium 7.01, Pfaffenwaldring 7
 

Abstract of the presentation:

Smart sensors in the broadest sense are sensors that are combined with dedicated hardware or software to produce a performance and/or functionality that goes greatly beyond that of the raw sensor. As such, smart sensors bear the potential to revolutionize all aspects of our everyday life, ranging from smart homes that benefit from ambient assisted living, optimized production lines in the frame of Industry 4.0 to high-end sensors that enable entirely new experiments in the scientific world.
In this talk, we will investigate the use of smart sensors in the latter field of high-end sensing for scientific applications and discuss how the multiphysics and advanced modeling aspects of state-of-the-art smart sensors are crucial for their performance.
To this end, we will discuss examples of biomedical quantum sensors that greatly benefit from the embedding of the interface electronics for enhanced performance. It will be discussed how an advanced modeling of the sensor together with a precise modeling of the interface electronics as nonlinear dynamical system can be used for co-designing sensor and electronics to improve the overall system performance. Finally, we will talk about the challenges in numerical simulations of such advanced sensor systems, which arise from the immense precision (often precisions of 10-9 or better are required) that is frequently required in the scientific context.

A finite-difference/finite-element framework for fluid-structure interaction using an immersed boundary method with variational transfer

Referent: Prof. Dr. Dominik Obrist, ARTORG Center for Biomedical Engineering Research, University of Bern

Time
4:00 pm
Auditorium 7.01, Pfaffenwaldring 7

Abstract of the presentation:

The flow systems of the heart and the great blood vessels comprise complex materials (soft tissue) and flows at moderately high Reynolds numbers which may undergo transition from laminar to turbulent flow. Computational modelling of such fluid-structure interaction (FSI) problems requires efficient high-fidelity solvers for structure and flow as well as a robust scheme for coupling the two phases.

We present a new FSI framework which comprises a finite-element solver for the full elastodynamics equations of the structure and a Navier-Stokes solver using high-order finite-difference schemes. The interaction between fluid and structure is modelled by an immersed boundary ansatz which uses a variational scheme for transferring data between the structural mesh and the Cartesian fluid grid.

Mixed-dimensional modeling and simulation

Referent: Prof. Dr. Jan Martin Nordbotten, University of Bergen

Time
4:00 pm
Auditorium 7.01, Pfaffenwaldring 7

Abstract of the presentation:

We provide an overview of mixed-dimensional physical processes, and the overarching principles governing the construction of consistent and well-posed mathematical models for these systems. We provide some mathematical structure, and show how this leads to a natural development of numerical methods, analogous to the case for classical (fixed-dimensional) problems. 

Micro-Macro Models for Reactive Flow and Transport Problems in Complex Media

Referent: Prof. Dr. Peter Knabner, University of Erlangen-Nürnberg

Time
4:00 pm
Auditorium 7.01, Pfaffenwaldring 7

Abstract of the presentation:

In porous media and other complex media with different length scales, (periodic) homogenization has been successfully applied for several decades to arrive at macroscopic, upscaled models, which only keep the microscopic information by means of a decoupled computation of “effective” parameters on a reference cell. The derivation of Darcy’s law for flow in porous media is a prominent example. Numerical methods for this kind of macroscopic models have been intensively discussed and in general are considered to be favourable compared to a direct microscale computation. On the other hand, if the interplay of processes becomes too complex, e.g. the scale seperation does not act in a proper way, the porous medium itself is evolving, ..., the upscaled models obtained may be micro-macro models in the sense, that the coupling of the macroscopic equations and the equations at the reference cell is both ways, i.e. at each macroscopic point a reference cell is attached and the solution in the reference cell depends on the macroscopic solution (at that point) and the macroscopic solution depends on the microscopic solutions in the reference cells. At the first glance such models seem to be numerically infeasible due to their enormous complexity ( in d+d spatial variables). If on the other hand this barrier can be overcome, micro-macro models are no longer a burden but a chance by allowing more general interaction of processes (evolving porous media, multiphase flow, general chemical reactions, ...), where the microscopic processes “compute” the constitutive laws, which need longer be assumed (similar to the concept of heterogeneous homogenization). We will discuss various examples and in particular numerical approaches to keep the numerical complexity in the range of pure macroscopic models.

Contact

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Barbara Teutsch

Coordinator Graduate School, Coach